Although the body is the largest piece of wood on a bass, the chosen wood species has less influence on the sound than the neck woods and the fingerboard woods. But the body is still an important part of the construction and therefore the sound and the ergonomics.

One should also consider the wear resistance of the body wood. Some softer woods should be hard finished while other look and feel best with an oil finish. We are happy to advise you on your choice.

Just as with our neck woods we have been experimenting to find the right woods for our bodies over the past years. Again this led us to the use of less familiar wood species, like Solomon padouk, Khaya mahogany, tulip wood and abachi.

 

The density of a particular piece has more influence on the sound than the species alone. Some wood species can vary a lot in weight depending on how and where the tree grew. For example; the same ash species is the lightest piece and the heaviest piece we have in stock. One grew in the swamp the other in the mountains.

The denser and heavier woods tend to have a bit more tone definition and sustain and they produce a bit clearer sound. The softer and lighter woods tend to be more snappy and have more "oomph". It is therefore very difficult to attach a sound specification to a species alone.

Underneath we described how the species we have in stock usualy influences the sound on our basses when using a piece piece of average weight.

 

Walnut
 

There are many species of walnut and they are all dark colored. From light brown to dark chocolate brown. The nicest are the dark black walnut from the USA and the east European or Turkish walnut. Walnut looks good with every finish but we prefer to finish with our catalyzed oil finish to preserve the natural look of this beautiful wood. Sometimes it has nice figure (flame, crotch and fiddleback). Walnut is a medium to heavy weight body wood.

Basses with a walnut body often have a nice growl and tend to have an improved tone definition.

Tulipwood
 

Tulipwood is a medium to heavy weight body wood. The color is pale with little or no distinct grain lines but sometimes it has areas which have a green color or even purple. This discoloration is rare but can look amazing. The grain is tight.

Basses with a tulipwood body often add a bit to a good note definition, good sustain and clear tone.

Solomon Padouk
 

Salomon padouk, also called narra, it's a medium to lightweight body wood but can vary a lot in weight. It has a warm color ranging from honey yellow to orange with sometimes black and red stripes. It has a warm fat tone with long sustaining notes similar to koa and mahogany but the notes are more articulate and defined. The Solomon we use has been harvested with care for the enviroment and is a initiative from the Solomon Islands.

The beautiful burls from this tree are called Amboyna burls and are very rare.

Basses with a Solomon padouk body often have a nice clear but warm tone articulation.

Mahogany
 

We use khaya mahogany also known as African mahogany. It's a medium to lightweight body wood with a nice warm red brown color and resembles the traditional Honduran mahogany in appearance.

Basses with a mahogany body often add punch and warmth to the tone. FSC

Limba
 

 

Limba, also known as korina, has been used for guitar bodies (Korina Flying V from Gibson) since the 1960's. It is lightweight to medium weight and is easy to finish. The colour is pale with little or no distinct grain lines. Limba looks good both lacquered and oil finished.

The sound is percussive with a nice attack and pronounced low end.

 

Guariuba

Guariuba is one of the heaviest body woods we offer and is slightly denser than walnut. The wood has an open grain which gives it a tough look. It is also very wear resistant and therefore we prefer to finish with our catalyzed oil finish to preserve the natural look of this beautiful wood. Guariuba is bright red when freshly cut and darkens to a deep yellow brown color over time.

Basses with a guariuba body often have a warm yet articulat sound with an emphasis on a big low end. FSC

Alder
 

Alder is one of the most used woods in electric bass and guitar building. The reason it has been a favorite in mass produced instruments since the 1950's is because it is lightweight, cheap, easily available, easy to machine and easy to finish. The color is light brown with little or no distinct grain lines. Because it is so soft we recommend a hard finish.

Basses with an alder body usually have a punchy, vintage tone.

Ash
 

Ash is also one of the most used woods in electric bass and guitar building. The European ash is a hard and heavy wood Ash that grows in warm and swampy areas can be very light and is called swamp ash. The heavy ash can be almost three times as heavy as the lightest pieces.

Basses with an ash body usually have a nice fast attack. The heavier the piece is the more sustain it has. Because of the light color and softness swamp ash should be hard finished.